People

Greg Lowry is the Walter J. Blenko, Sr. Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is deputy director of the NSF/EPA Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT), and is on the editorial board for Environmental Science: Nano and Nature: Scientific Data. Lowry holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of California at Davis, an M.S. in civil and environmental engineering from University of Wisconsin at Madison, and a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Stanford University.

His research focuses on environmental geochemistry, nanochemistry, and environmental nanotechnology. His current professional interests include applications of nanomaterials for sustainable agriculture, robotics for autonomous soil sampling and site characterization, environmental fate and transport of chemicals, groundwater remediation, and environmental issues related to fossil energy.

Lowry is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He has published more than 150 scientific articles in leading environmental engineering and science journals, and a book on nanoscale iron particles for groundwater remediation. He has received awards for his research from the American Society of Civil Engineers (Walter L. Huber Civil Engineering Research Award), the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (Malcolm Pirnie/AEESP Frontiers in Research Award), and the American Chemical Society (Best Feature Article in Environmental Science &Technology for 2012). He received the Distinguished Service award from AEESP in 2018, and was awarded the Fenves Award for Systems Research in 2011. He is a “highly cited” scientist (top 1%) in the area of ecology and environment according to Thompson Reuters/Clarivate (2014-2018).

Lowry’s research has been supported by the federal government (National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Army Research Office, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency), with additional grant support from industry. Lowry has served on two NAS panels: Science Breakthroughs to Advance Food and Agricultural Research by 2030 and the Committee to Develop a Research Strategy for Environmental Health and Safety Aspects of Engineered Nanomaterials. He served as a science advisory board member for the international research Centers, NANOREM and NANOFASE.

Office
123E Baker/Porter Hall
Phone
412.268.2948
Fax
412.268.7813
Email
glowry@cmu.edu
Google Scholar
Gregory Lowry
Websites
Gregory V. Lowry

Discovering how Nanoparticles Dissolve in Natural Water Environments

Nanoparticles in Complex Environmental Systems

Education

2000 Ph.D., Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University

1995 MS, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin

1992 BS, Chemical Engineering, University of California

Media mentions


TechCrunch

Lowry and team featured in TechCrunch

Research by CEE’s Greg Lowry and his collaborators was featured in TechCrunch. The team has discovered a new method for delivering key nutrients to plant roots. This method would help plants absorb nearly 100% of nutrients and pesticides sprayed onto their leaves.

CMU Engineering

A new route for plant nutrient delivery

CEE researchers have discovered a way to deliver nanoparticles into plant leaves for efficient delivery to the root, paving the way toward sustainable food production.

CMU Engineering

Lowry elected 2018 AAAS fellow

CEE’s Greg Lowry has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for his efforts in advancing environmental engineering and the use of nanomaterials.

CMU Engineering

Water matters to metal nanoparticles

CEE researchers make breakthrough discovery that gold nanoparticles can dissolve when they interact with freshwater aquatic plants—instead of remaining stable as commonly thought.

CMU Engineering

The future of agriculture is science

CEE Professor Greg Lowry works on NAS committee to identify science breakthroughs for sustainable and resilient agriculture.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Lowry quoted on fertilizer runoff

CEE’s Gregory Lowry was quoted in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette about methods to prevent fertilizer runoff and the environmental impacts thereof to consider.

CMU Engineering

NanoFARM: Using nanoparticles to grow food

The answer to the growing, worldwide food production problem may have a tiny solution—nanoparticles.

CMU Engineering

Professorships honor academic leaders

Through endowed professorships, the college honors and supports faculty by providing the resources they need to remain at the forefront of their fields.