People

Jerry Wang joined CMU after a postdoctoral researcher position at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Department of Chemical Engineering. He has past research in the areas of nanophotonics and metamaterials (Argonne National Lab), high-energy physics (Yale/CERN), fluid mechanics at non-infinitesimal Reynolds numbers (Yale), and cell biology (University of Illinois). His research interests involve using mechanics, statistical physics, and high-performance computing to understand nanoscale structural and transport phenomena, with the goal of developing very small solutions for very big problems in the water-energy nexus.

Phone
412.268.1175
Email
gjwang@cmu.edu
Websites
Jerry Wang's lab

Computational Modeling of Liquid Crystals

Understanding nanoscale structural and transport phenomena

Education

2019 Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering and Computation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2015 S.M., Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013 B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Mathematics & Physics, Yale University

Media mentions


CMU Engineering

Honoring our educators

Six members from the College of Engineering were recognized at CMU’s annual Celebration of Education Awards.

CMU Engineering

Liquid crystals and the hunt for defects

Civil and environmental engineering researchers are creating tools to help unlock the secrets of liquid crystals.

CMU CEE

Wang receives ASCE Civil Engineering Education New Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award

CEE’s Jerry Wang received the ASCE Civil Engineering Education New Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award for his dedication to his students and their education.

CMU Engineering

Small particles research reveals benefits of interaction

Undergraduate research opportunity gave Kelby Kramer the chance to explore topics and gain skills outside his chosen field.

CMU Engineering

Meitz first in 25 years to receive DOE graduate fellowship

Mechanical engineering student Ethan Meitz is working to create predictive nanoscale models for the thermophysical properties of liquids.

Krause and Wang named Wimmer Faculty Fellows

CEE’s Jerry Wang and MSE’s Mandie Krause have been named Wimmer Faculty Fellows at the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence and Educational Innovation.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Li spins success in engineering, table tennis

“If you want to improve your game, you must work very hard on the drills and strokes and repeat the basic training many, many times. That is also the mindset used when I try to solve a hard engineering problem,” Li says.

Mechanical Engineering

Understanding active matter unlocks new material properties

An interdisciplinary collaboration provides news insights into modeling and understanding the inner workings of active-matter systems. "Active matter" describes particles with the ability to convert stored or ambient energy into motion.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Understanding active matter unlocks new material properties

When introduced to a system, active matter harvests energy and begins to move. The term refers to systems that can be either biological or artificial, ranging from the self-organizing components of a living cell to synthetic colloids that react to light with movement. When added to an ordinary material, active particles can change the properties and behavior of that material.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

The evolution of CEE: Preparing the next generation of engineers and problem solvers

Our CEE faculty are united in the goal of developing socially conscious engineers who understand how their decisions impact communities and individuals. Across the curriculum, courses examine issues like inequitable pollution, resource access, climate impacts, and community displacements through historical and current lenses, while also emphasizing the skills needed to identify potential problems, address existing injustices, and design more equitable infrastructure in the future.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Kramer awarded American Bridge Leadership Award

Kramer has distinguished himself not only academically but also as a leader among his peers. He routinely spends time during lab sessions helping his peers work through difficulties they were encountering on the assigned problems and stepping up as a leader in group assignments.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Lowry and colleagues receive two NSF awards for nanoparticle research

The first grant will fund research on the potential of nanoparticles as a nitrogen delivery system. The second award will allow Lowry to create nano-enabled materials that can contribute to personalized biomanufacturing.